Fr. 43.50

Liberty, Equality, and Humbug - Orwell''s Political Ideals

English · Hardback

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Zusatztext [A] perceptive study of George Orwell... Almost 70 years after his death, Orwell's two most important fictions, Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four, are more relevant than ever... This study allows us to understand him better. Informationen zum Autor David Dwan is Associate Professor in English at Hertford College, Oxford. He writes on the relationship between literature and intellectual history, particularly moral and political philosophy, from the late eighteenth- to the early twentieth century. Klappentext A lucid and fluent account of George Orwell's political thought that complicates and challenges the commonplace view and shows how Orwell's fiction allows us to address some of the most fundamental problems of Western political thought, and how literature can be a source of political understanding. Zusammenfassung George Orwell is watching you and you're watching him. Britain pays its respects in the form of the Orwell Prize, the Orwell Lecture, and, more recently, Orwell Day. A statue of Orwell now stands outside Broadcasting House in London and he continues to tower over broadsheet journalism. His ghost is repeatedly summoned in the houses of Parliament and in schools across Britain. In Europe and the US, citizens confront the perennial question: "What would Orwell say?" Orwell is part of the political vocabulary of our times, yet partly due to this popularity, what he stands for remains opaque. His writing confirms deep and widely shared intuitions about political justice, but much of its enduring fascination derives from the fact that these intuitions don't quite add up. David Dwan accounts for these inconsistencies by exploring the broader moral conflict at the centre of Orwell's work and the troubled idealism it yields. Examining the whole sweep of Orwell's writings, this book shows how literature can be a rich source of political wisdom.

List of contents










  • Introduction

  • 1: Liberty

  • 2: Equality

  • 3: Solidarity

  • 4: Truth

  • 5: Happiness

  • Conclusion



About the author










David Dwan is Associate Professor in English at Hertford College, Oxford. He writes on the relationship between literature and intellectual history, particularly moral and political philosophy, from the late eighteenth- to the early twentieth century.


Summary

George Orwell is watching you and you're watching him. Britain pays its respects in the form of the Orwell Prize, the Orwell Lecture, and, more recently, Orwell Day. A statue of Orwell now stands outside Broadcasting House in London and he continues to tower over broadsheet journalism. His ghost is repeatedly summoned in the houses of Parliament and in schools across Britain. In Europe and the US, citizens confront the perennial question: "What would Orwell say?"

Orwell is part of the political vocabulary of our times, yet partly due to this popularity, what he stands for remains opaque. His writing confirms deep and widely shared intuitions about political justice, but much of its enduring fascination derives from the fact that these intuitions don't quite add up. David Dwan accounts for these inconsistencies by exploring the broader moral conflict at the centre of Orwell's work and the troubled idealism it yields. Examining the whole sweep of Orwell's writings, this book shows how literature can be a rich source of political wisdom.

Product details

Authors David Dwan, David (Associate Professor Dwan
Publisher Oxford University Press
 
Languages English
Product format Hardback
Released 25.10.2018
 
EAN 9780198738527
ISBN 978-0-19-873852-7
No. of pages 320
Subject Humanities, art, music > Linguistics and literary studies > General and comparative literary studies

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