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Moral Progress in Dark Times - Universal Values for the 21st Century - Clot

English · Hardback

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Informationen zum Autor Markus Gabriel holds the chair for Epistemology, Modern and Contemporary Philosophy at the University of Bonn, and is also the Director of the International Center for Philosophy in Bonn and Academic Director at The New Institute in Hamburg. Klappentext The challenges we face today are unprecedented, from the existential crisis of climate change to the global security threats posed by aggression in Ukraine and elsewhere. Add to this the crisis of liberal democracy and we seem to be swirling in a state of moral disarray, unsure whether there are any principles to which we can appeal today that would be anything other than particularistic.In contrast to this view, Markus Gabriel puts forward the bold argument that there are guiding moral principles for human behaviour. These guiding principles extend across cultures; they are universally valid and form the source of universal values in the twenty-first century. In developing what he calls a 'New Moral Realism', Gabriel breathes fresh life into the idea that humanity's task on our planet is to enable moral progress through cooperation. It is only by achieving moral progress in a way that incorporates universal values - and thus embraces all of humanity - that we can avoid the abyss into which we will otherwise slide.Written with verve, wit and imagination, Gabriel's call for a new enlightenment is a welcome antidote to the value relativism and nihilism of our times, and it lays out a moral framework within which we can work together - as surely we must - to deal with the great challenges we now face. Zusammenfassung The challenges we face today are unprecedented, from the existential crisis of climate change to the global security threats posed by aggression in Ukraine and elsewhere. Add to this the crisis of liberal democracy and we seem to be swirling in a state of moral disarray, unsure whether there are any principles to which we can appeal today that would be anything other than particularistic.In contrast to this view, Markus Gabriel puts forward the bold argument that there are guiding moral principles for human behaviour. These guiding principles extend across cultures; they are universally valid and form the source of universal values in the twenty-first century. In developing what he calls a 'New Moral Realism', Gabriel breathes fresh life into the idea that humanity's task on our planet is to enable moral progress through cooperation. It is only by achieving moral progress in a way that incorporates universal values - and thus embraces all of humanity - that we can avoid the abyss into which we will otherwise slide.Written with verve, wit and imagination, Gabriel's call for a new enlightenment is a welcome antidote to the value relativism and nihilism of our times, and it lays out a moral framework within which we can work together - as surely we must - to deal with the great challenges we now face. Inhaltsverzeichnis Preface to the English editionIntroductionChapter 1: What Values Are, and Why They Are UniversalThe Good, the Bad and the Neutral: Basic Moral RulesMoral FactsThe Limits of Free Speech: How Tolerant Is Democracy?Morality Trumps MajorityCultural Relativism: The Law of the StrongestBoghossian and the TalibanThere Are No Judeo-Christian Values - And Why Islam Is Clearly Part of GermanyNorth Korea and the Nazi MachineValue Pluralism and Value NihilismNietzsche's Ghastly Confusion(s)Chapter 2: Why There Are Moral Facts but Not Ethical DilemmasUniversalism is not EurocentrismAgeism Towards Children and Other Moral Deficits in Everyday LifeMoral TensionSusceptibility to Error, a Fictional Messiah and the Nonsense of Postmodern ArbitrarinessMoral FeelingsDoctors, Patients, Indian Police OfficersThe Categorical Imperative as Social Glue'A?' Don't Contradict Yourself!Self-Evident Moral Truths and the Descriptive Problem of EthicsWhy the Federal Chan...

List of contents

Preface to the English editionIntroductionChapter 1: What Values Are, and Why They Are UniversalThe Good, the Bad and the Neutral: Basic Moral RulesMoral FactsThe Limits of Free Speech: How Tolerant Is Democracy?Morality Trumps MajorityCultural Relativism: The Law of the StrongestBoghossian and the TalibanThere Are No Judeo-Christian Values - And Why Islam Is Clearly Part of GermanyNorth Korea and the Nazi MachineValue Pluralism and Value NihilismNietzsche's Ghastly Confusion(s)Chapter 2: Why There Are Moral Facts but Not Ethical DilemmasUniversalism is not EurocentrismAgeism Towards Children and Other Moral Deficits in Everyday LifeMoral TensionSusceptibility to Error, a Fictional Messiah and the Nonsense of Postmodern ArbitrarinessMoral FeelingsDoctors, Patients, Indian Police OfficersThe Categorical Imperative as Social Glue'A?' Don't Contradict Yourself!Self-Evident Moral Truths and the Descriptive Problem of EthicsWhy the Federal Chancellor Is Not the LeaderThe Day of Judgement, or, How We Can Recognize Moral FactsWith or Without God in the Kingdom of EndsBeating Children Was Never Good, Not Even in 1880Chapter 3: Social Identity - Why Racism, Xenophobia and Misogyny Are EvilHabitus and Stereotypes: All Resources Are ScarceLifting the Veil of Dehumanization: From Identity Politics to Difference PoliticsCoronavirus: Reality Strikes BackA Different Side of Thuringia: In Jena, Racism Is DebunkedThe Value of Truth (Without a Hall of Mirrors)Stereotypes, Brexit and German NationalismThe Effectiveness of Presumed CommunitiesThe Society of PopulismThe Contradictions of Left-Wing Identity PoliticsEveryone is the Other: From Identity Politics to Difference Politics (and Beyond)Indifference Politics: On the Way to Colour-BlindnessChapter 4: Moral Progress in the Twenty-First CenturySlavery and Sarrazin(Supposedly) Different Conceptions of Humans Do Not Justify Anything, Least of All SlaveryMoral Progress and Regression in the Time of the CoronavirusThe Limits of EconomismBiological Universalism and the Viral PandemicFor a Metaphysical PandemicMorality AltruismHuman Beings: Who We Are and Who We Want to BeEthics for EveryoneEpilogueGlossaryNotesIndex

About the author










Markus Gabriel holds the chair for Epistemology, Modern and Contemporary Philosophy at the University of Bonn, and is also the Director of the International Center for Philosophy in Bonn and Academic Director at The New Institute in Hamburg.

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"This book is a passionate defense of moral realism against the now standard relativism on the topic, written in Gabriel's usual clear prose. His gift for illuminating examples and anecdotes, combined with his thorough philosophical knowledge and hyper-alertness to world events, ensure that Moral Progress in Dark Times speaks directly to the conscience of the twenty-first-century citizen."--Graham Harman"In this book, Markus Gabriel seeks a possible resurrection of history from the normative foundations of a moral realism. In this search, we discover something like a non-Eurocentric universal history, based on the existence of universalizable moral facts capable of transcending specific contexts and guiding us through dark times. Aware of the challenges of this new universalism, Gabriel does not shy away from any controversy and invites us to a debate where the question is no less than the possibilities of a new enlightenment."--Vladimir Safatle"[T]he book's themes that morality is real and grounded in facts, that scientific-technological progress should be guided by ethics, and that this requires heavy-duty interdisciplinary cooperation (including a role for the humanities!) as well as a fundamental belief in truth and human dignity, are desperately needed in our current historical moment."--Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews

Product details

Authors Gabriel, M Gabriel, Markus Gabriel, Wieland Hoban
Assisted by Wieland Hoban (Translation)
Publisher Polity Press
 
Languages English
Product format Hardback
Released 31.10.2022
 
EAN 9781509549481
ISBN 978-1-5095-4948-1
No. of pages 280
Subjects Humanities, art, music > Philosophy
Non-fiction book > Philosophy, religion > Philosophy: general, reference works

Ethik, Philosophie, Ethics, Philosophy, Continental Philosophy, Kontinentalphilosophie, Allg. Philosophie

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