Fr. 29.90

Klondike Tales

English · Paperback

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Informationen zum Autor Jack London (1876-1916), by turns a renegade adventurer, a war correspondent, and an avowed socialist, first achieved fame with The Son of the Wolf (1900), a collection of short stories drawn from his experiences in the Klondike gold rush "The greatest story Jack London ever wrote was the story he lived," said Alfred Kazin. Klappentext As a young man in the summer of 1897, Jack London joined the Klondike gold rush. From that seminal experience emerged these gripping, inimitable wilderness tales, which have endured as some of London's best and most defining work. With remarkable insight and unflinching realism, London describes the punishing adversity that awaited men in the brutal, frozen expanses of the Yukon, and the extreme tactics these adventurers and travelers adopted to survive. As Van Wyck Brooks observed, "One felt that the stories had been somehow lived-that they were not merely observed-that the author was not telling tales but telling his life.” This edition is unique to the Modern Library, featuring twenty-three carefully chosen stories from London's three collected Northland volumes and his later Klondike tales. It also includes two maps of the region, and notes on the text.The White Silence “Carmen won’t last more than a couple of days.” Mason spat out a chunk of ice and surveyed the poor animal ruefully, then put her foot in his mouth and proceeded to bite out the ice which clustered cruelly between the toes. “I never saw a dog with a highfalutin’ name that ever was worth a rap,” he said, as he concluded his task and shoved her aside. “They just fade away and die under the responsibility. Did ye ever see one go wrong with a sensible name like Cassiar, Siwash, or Husky? No, sir! Take a look at Shookum here, he’s”– Snap! The lean brute flashed up, the white teeth just missing Mason’s throat. “Ye will, will ye?” A shrewd clout behind the ear with the butt of the dogwhip stretched the animal in the snow, quivering softly, a yellow slaver dripping from its fangs. “As I was saying, just look at Shookum, here–he’s got the spirit. Bet ye he eats Carmen before the week’s out.” “I’ll bank another proposition against that,” replied Malemute Kid, reversing the frozen bread placed before the fire to thaw. “We’ll eat Shookum before the trip is over. What d’ ye say, Ruth?” The Indian woman settled the coffee with a piece of ice, glanced from Malemute Kid to her husband, then at the dogs, but vouchsafed no reply. It was such a palpable truism that none was necessary. Two hundred miles of unbroken trail in prospect, with a scant six days’ grub for themselves and none for the dogs, could admit no other alternative. The two men and the woman grouped about the fire and began their meagre meal. The dogs lay in their harnesses, for it was a midday halt, and watched each mouthful enviously. “No more lunches after to-day,” said Malemute Kid. “And we’ve got to keep a close eye on the dogs,–they’re getting vicious. They’d just as soon pull a fellow down as not, if they get a chance.” “And I was president of an Epworth1 once, and taught in the Sunday school.” Having irrelevantly delivered himself of this, Mason fell into a dreamy contemplation of his steaming moccasins, but was aroused by Ruth filling his cup. “Thank God, we’ve got slathers of tea! I’ve seen it growing, down in Tennessee. What would n’t I give for a hot corn pone just now! Never mind, Ruth; you won’t starve much longer, nor wear moccasins either.” The woman threw off her gloom at this, and in her eyes welled up a great love for her white lord,–the first white man she had ever seen,–the first man whom she had known to treat a woman as something better than a mere animal or beast of burden. “Yes, Ruth,” continued her husband, having recourse to the macaronic jargon in which it was alone possible for them to understand each other; “wait till we cl...

Product details

Authors Gary Kinder, Jack London
Assisted by Gary Kinder (Introduction)
Publisher Modern Library PRH US
 
Languages English
Product format Paperback
Released 13.03.2001
 
EAN 9780375756856
ISBN 978-0-375-75685-6
No. of pages 320
Dimensions 133 mm x 203 mm x 15 mm
Series MODERN LIBRARY
Modern Library Classics
Modern Library Classics (Paper
Modern Library Classics
MODERN LIBRARY
Subject Fiction > Narrative literature

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